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Ariana Arzani



Posts: 31
Join date: 2011-01-25

PostSubject: Budget Crisis: Unresolved   Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:10 pm

Budget Crisis: Unresolved

After years of sitting on the sidelines watching California’s business unfold with little regard for their input, Republicans had a rare opportunity in recent months to step in and finally contribute to shape part of the bill in their favor, however, the GOP did not achieve such a compromise. A plan to restructure the budget has not yet reached a consensus and it’s unclear as to who should be held responsible.
Governor Jerry Brown’s budget proposal axe seemed to hover over higher-education and school systems. Under this “all-cuts” proposal, $15.4 billion would be taken from health and social aid, which, in education, translates to service cuts. The K-12 system will lose close to $5 billion dollars, while the community colleges will be cut $585 million and the Cal States and UC’s would see cuts of $1.1 billion. “It means we will not be able to serve as many students, or offer as many classes” said Peter Goldstein, vice chancellor for finance and administration for the City College of San Francisco.
Due to the conflicting ideas of the two parties, Brown was not successful in passing a new budget proposal for California and a compromise was not reached. In his own party, Brown fell short on accumulating enough votes and therefore he needed to accept the differences of the parties in order to close the judgment gap with four Republican votes.
As the talks broke down, Brown attempted to use incentives to get these four votes for his budget plan, promising them a rollback on government employee pensions and an ease on business regulations, which Republicans had been pushing for. Despite his efforts Republican interest was inconclusive and the Republicans did not succumb to his efforts to find a middle ground in Sacramento.
If passed, this proposed plan would harbor severe consequences for the current and future generations residing in California. This occurrence also represents the growing hostility and discord between the two major political parties and a spirit of uncooperative behavior and sheer hardheadedness. Until these conflicts are resolved, a stalemate will persist in the capital, creating more tensions and hurting all parties involved, including Jerry Brown, Republicans and Democrats. For this reason, many question the sustainability of the entire governmental system that, many times, leaves decisions at a deadlock and fails to resolve significant issues.
As a public school in California, AHS would be dearly affected by these cuts, and on top of our exhausted Arcadia Educational Foundation (AEF) funds, we would found ourselves in a dire situation. It is argued that education should be one of the last things to cut, and only as a last resort, for the students today will be the politicians tomorrow. Freshman Abby Rees altercates that if educational cuts do occur, “students will be getting a half-rate education and then are expected to become leaders which doesn’t seem like a recipe for success.” Abby goes on to say that if budget cuts target other areas of the state, rather that schools and we “keep teachers, it means that we can grow up to become fiscally responsible adults that are both capable and independent.”
The conflicts in Sacramento pertain to everyone because they affect the future of the entire state. Republicans lost a rare chance to shape key policies due to their stubbornness to work with Democrats, resulting in a loss for both. A compromise must be reached, although the conflicting ideas of political parties may extend long into the future. Sadly, once these budget cuts come into play, our school, along with thousands of other schools, must get through this mess of cuts and reductions as best as we can and ease the process with fundraising and donations.
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Josie Yang



Posts: 514
Join date: 2010-07-08

PostSubject: first draft revision   Thu Apr 14, 2011 8:28 pm

After years of sitting on the sidelines watching California’s business unfold with little regard for their input, Republicans had a rare opportunity in recent months to step in and finally contribute to shape part of the bill <wat bill? in their favor, <semi-colon or period. not a comma> however, the GOP did not achieve such a compromise. A plan to restructure the budget has not yet reached a consensus [color=red<reach a consensus = reach an agreement, plans cant reach agreements>[/color] and it’s unclear as to who should be held responsible.
Governor Jerry Brown’s budget proposal axe seemed to hover over higher-education and school systems. Under this “all-cuts” proposal, $15.4 billion would be taken from health and social aid, which, in education, translates to service cuts. The K-12 system will lose close to $5 billion dollars <delete dollars>, while the community colleges will be cut $585 million and the Cal States and UC’s <delete apostrophe> would <will, not would> see cuts of $1.1 billion. “It means we will not be able to serve as many students, or offer as many classes <comma here>” said Peter Goldstein, vice chancellor for finance and administration for the City College of San Francisco.
Due to the conflicting ideas of the two parties, <Governor> Brown was not successful in passing a new budget proposal for California and a compromise was not reached. In his own party, <Governor> Brown fell short on accumulating enough votes and therefore he needed to accept the differences of the parties in order to close the judgment gap with four Republican votes.
As the talks broke down, <Governor> Brown attempted to use incentives to get these four votes for his budget plan, promising them a rollback on government employee pensions and an ease on business regulations, which Republicans had been pushing for. Despite his efforts Republican interest was inconclusive and the Republicans did not succumb to his efforts to find a middle ground in Sacramento.
If passed, this proposed plan would harbor severe consequences for the current and future generations residing in California. This occurrence also represents the growing hostility and discord between the two major political parties and a spirit of uncooperative behavior and sheer hardheadedness. Until these conflicts are resolved, a stalemate will persist in the capital, creating more tensions and hurting all parties involved, including <Governor, not Jerry> Jerry Brown, Republicans and Democrats. For this reason, many question the sustainability of the entire governmental <government> system that, many times, leaves decisions at a deadlock and fails to resolve significant issues.
As a public school in California, AHS would be dearly [color=red<misused, delete 'dearly'>[/color] affected by these cuts, and on top of our exhausted Arcadia Educational Foundation (AEF) funds, we would found <find> ourselves in a dire situation. It is argued that education should be one of the last things to cut, and only as a last resort, for the students today will be the politicians tomorrow. Freshman Abby Rees altercates <props for trying to use vocab, but this is insulting to Abby. also, use past tense> that if educational cuts do occur, “students will be getting a half-rate education and then are expected to become leaders which doesn’t seem like a recipe for success.” Abby goes on <went on, not goes on> to say that if budget cuts target other areas of the state, rather that schools <delete comma, rather than not rather that> and we “keep teachers, it means that we can grow up to become fiscally responsible adults that are both capable and independent.”
The conflicts in Sacramento pertain to everyone because they affect the future of the entire state. Republicans lost a rare chance to shape key policies due to their stubbornness <i think u mean unwillingness> to work with Democrats, resulting in a loss for both. A compromise must be reached, although the conflicting ideas of political parties may extend long into the future. Sadly, once these budget cuts come into play, our school, along with thousands of other schools, must get through this mess of cuts and reductions as best as we can and ease the process with fundraising and donations.
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Ariana Arzani



Posts: 31
Join date: 2011-01-25

PostSubject: Re: Budget Crisis: Unresolved   Fri Apr 15, 2011 6:18 pm

After years of sitting on the sidelines watching California’s business unfold with little regard for their input, Republicans had a rare opportunity in recent months to step in and finally contribute to shape part of the budget bill in their favor; however, the GOP did not achieve such a compromise. A plan to restructure the budget has not yet reached a consensus [color=red<reach a consensus = reach an agreement, plans cant reach agreements>[/color] and it’s unclear as to who should be held responsible.
Governor Jerry Brown’s budget proposal axe seemed to hover over higher-education and school systems. Under this “all-cuts” proposal, $15.4 billion would be taken from health and social aid, which, in education, translates to service cuts. The K-12 system will lose close to $5 billion, while the community colleges will be cut $585 million and the Cal States and UCs will see cuts of $1.1 billion. “It means we will not be able to serve as many students, or offer as many classes, ” said Peter Goldstein, vice chancellor for finance and administration for the City College of San Francisco.
Due to the conflicting ideas of the two parties, Governor Brown was not successful in passing a new budget proposal for California and a compromise was not reached. In his own party, Governor Brown fell short on accumulating enough votes and therefore he needed to accept the differences of the parties in order to close the judgment gap with four Republican votes.
As the talks broke down, Governor Brown attempted to use incentives to get these four votes for his budget plan, promising them a rollback on government employee pensions and an ease on business regulations, which Republicans had been pushing for. Despite his efforts Republican interest was inconclusive and the Republicans did not succumb to his efforts to find a middle ground in Sacramento.
If passed, this proposed plan would harbor severe consequences for the current and future generations residing in California. This occurrence also represents the growing hostility and discord between the two major political parties and a spirit of uncooperative behavior and sheer hardheadedness. Until these conflicts are resolved, a stalemate will persist in the capital, creating more tensions and hurting all parties involved, including Governor Brown, Republicans and Democrats. For this reason, many question the sustainability of the entire government system that, many times, leaves decisions at a deadlock and fails to resolve significant issues.
As a public school in California, AHS would be dearly [color=red<misused, delete 'dearly'>[/color] affected by these cuts, and on top of our exhausted Arcadia Educational Foundation (AEF) funds, we would find ourselves in a dire situation. It is argued that education should be one of the last things to cut, and only as a last resort, for the students today will be the politicians tomorrow. Freshman Abby Rees believed that if educational cuts do occur, “students will be getting a half-rate education and then are expected to become leaders which doesn’t seem like a recipe for success.” Abby went on to say that if budget cuts target other areas of the state, rather then schools and we “keep teachers, it means that we can grow up to become fiscally responsible adults that are both capable and independent.”
The conflicts in Sacramento pertain to everyone because they affect the future of the entire state. Republicans lost a rare chance to shape key policies due to their unwillingless to work with Democrats, resulting in a loss for both. A compromise must be reached, although the conflicting ideas of political parties may extend long into the future. Sadly, once these budget cuts come into play, our school, along with thousands of other schools, must get through this mess of cuts and reductions as best as we can and ease the process with fundraising and donations.
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Josie Yang



Posts: 514
Join date: 2010-07-08

PostSubject: second draft revision   Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:14 pm

After years of sitting on the sidelines watching California’s business unfold with little regard for their input, Republicans had a rare opportunity in recent months to step in and finally contribute to shape part of the budget bill in their favor; however, the GOP did not achieve such a compromise. A plan to restructure the budget has not yet reached a consensus <reach a consensus = reach an agreement, plans cant reach agreements but politicians can> and it’s unclear as to who should be held responsible.
Governor Jerry Brown’s budget proposal axe seemed to hover over higher-education and school systems. Under this “all-cuts” proposal, $15.4 billion would be taken from health and social aid, which, in education, translates to service cuts. The K-12 system will lose close to $5 billion, while the community colleges will be cut $585 million and the Cal States and UCs will see cuts of $1.1 billion. “It means we will not be able to serve as many students, or offer as many classes, ” said Peter Goldstein, vice chancellor for finance and administration for the City College of San Francisco.
Due to the conflicting ideas of the two parties, Governor Brown was not successful in passing a new budget proposal for California and a compromise was not reached. In his own party, Governor Brown fell short on accumulating enough votes and therefore he needed to accept the differences of the parties in order to close the judgment gap with four Republican votes.
As the talks broke down, Governor Brown attempted to use incentives to get these four votes for his budget plan, promising them a rollback on government employee pensions and an ease on business regulations, which Republicans had been pushing for. Despite his efforts Republican interest was inconclusive and the Republicans did not succumb to his efforts <repetitive use of 'efforts'> to find a middle ground in Sacramento.
If passed, this proposed plan would harbor severe consequences for the current and future generations residing in California. This occurrence also represents the growing hostility and discord between the two major political parties and a spirit of uncooperative behavior and sheer hardheadedness. Until these conflicts are resolved, a stalemate will persist in the capital, creating more tensions and hurting all parties involved, including Governor Brown, Republicans and Democrats. For this reason, many question the sustainability of the entire government system that, many times, <delete many times and commas, replace with often> leaves decisions at a deadlock and fails to resolve significant issues.
As a public school in California, AHS would be dearly <misused, delete 'dearly' replace with 'greatly'> affected by these cuts, and on top of our exhausted Arcadia Educational Foundation (AEF) funds, we would find ourselves in a dire situation. It is argued that education should be one of the last things to cut, and only as a last resort, for the students today will be the politicians tomorrow. Freshman Abby Rees believed that if educational cuts do occur, “students will be getting a half-rate education and then are expected to become leaders which doesn’t seem like a recipe for success.” Abby went on to say that if budget cuts target other areas of the state, rather then schools and we “keep teachers, it means that we can grow up to become fiscally responsible adults that are both capable and independent.”
The conflicts in Sacramento pertain to everyone because they affect the future of the entire state. Republicans lost a rare chance to shape key policies due to their unwillingless <unwillingness> to work with Democrats, resulting in a loss for both. A compromise must be reached, although the conflicting ideas of political parties may extend long into the future. Sadly, once these budget cuts come into play, our school, along with thousands of other schools, must get through this mess of cuts and reductions as best as we can and ease the process with fundraising and donations.
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Ariana Arzani



Posts: 31
Join date: 2011-01-25

PostSubject: Re: Budget Crisis: Unresolved   Mon Apr 18, 2011 9:26 am

After years of sitting on the sidelines watching California’s business unfold with little regard for their input, Republicans had a rare opportunity in recent months to step in and finally contribute to shape part of the budget bill in their favor; however, the GOP did not achieve such a compromise. A plan to restructure the budget did not yet reach a consensus and it’s unclear as to who should be held responsible.
Governor Jerry Brown’s budget proposal axe seemed to hover over higher-education and school systems. Under this “all-cuts” proposal, $15.4 billion would be taken from health and social aid, which, in education, translates to service cuts. The K-12 system will lose close to $5 billion, while the community colleges will be cut $585 million and the Cal. States and UCs will see cuts of $1.1 billion. “It means we will not be able to serve as many students, or offer as many classes, ” said Peter Goldstein, vice chancellor for finance and administration for the City College of San Francisco.
Due to the conflicting ideas of the two parties, Governor Brown was not successful in passing a new budget proposal for California and a compromise was not reached. In his own party, Governor Brown fell short on accumulating enough votes and therefore he needed to accept the differences of the parties in order to close the judgment gap with four Republican votes.
As the talks broke down, Governor Brown attempted to use incentives to get these four votes for his budget plan, promising them a rollback on government employee pensions and an ease on business regulations, which Republicans had been pushing for. Despite his efforts Republican interest was inconclusive and the Republicans did not succumb to his determination to find a middle ground in Sacramento.
If passed, this proposed plan would harbor severe consequences for the current and future generations residing in California. This occurrence also represents the growing hostility and discord between the two major political parties and a spirit of uncooperative behavior and sheer hardheadedness. Until these conflicts are resolved, a stalemate will persist in the capital, creating more tensions and hurting all parties involved, including Governor Brown, Republicans and Democrats. For this reason, many question the sustainability of the entire government system that, often times leaves decisions at a deadlock and fails to resolve significant issues.
As a public school in California, AHS would be greatly affected by these cuts, and on top of our exhausted Arcadia Educational Foundation (AEF) funds, we would find ourselves in a dire situation. It is argued that education should be one of the last things to cut, and only as a last resort, for the students today will be the politicians tomorrow. Freshman Abby Rees believed that if educational cuts do occur, “students will be getting a half-rate education and then are expected to become leaders which doesn’t seem like a recipe for success.” Abby went on to say that if budget cuts target other areas of the state, rather than schools and we “keep teachers, it means that we can grow up to become fiscally responsible adults that are both capable and independent.”
The conflicts in Sacramento pertain to everyone because they affect the future of the entire state. Republicans lost a rare chance to shape key policies due to their unwillingness to work with Democrats, resulting in a loss for both. A compromise must be reached, although the conflicting ideas of political parties may extend long into the future. Sadly, once these budget cuts come into play, our school, along with thousands of other schools, must get through this mess of cuts and reductions as best as we can and ease the process with fundraising and donations.
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